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Thursday, August 6, 2020 | History

3 edition of retinal circulation found in the catalog.

retinal circulation

George N. Wise

retinal circulation

by George N. Wise

  • 293 Want to read
  • 24 Currently reading

Published by Harper & Row in New York .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Retina -- Diseases.,
  • Retina -- Blood-vessels.

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographies.

    Statement[by] George N. Wise, Colin T. Dollery [and] Paul Henkind.
    ContributionsDollery, Colin T., joint author., Henkind, Paul, joint author.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsRE661.V3 W57
    The Physical Object
    Paginationviii, 566 p.
    Number of Pages566
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL4467888M
    ISBN 100061427675
    LC Control Number79156133

      Dilated, Tortuous Retinal Veins. Vascular occlusion is the second most common cause of blindness due to retinal disease, following diabetes. 1 The retinal venules typically present as both dilated and tortuous preceding and during a vascular occlusive event. Virchow’s triad—a term used to describe various etiologies of thrombosis—consists of hemodynamic changes (blood stasis. However, retinal macular circulation appears to correlate negatively linearly with age but correlated well with the concurrent decrease in ganglion cells in the human tissue,. The time from injection to first appearance in retina is said to vary between ±s in normal volunteers [8].

    The blocked circulation can lead to swelling and bleeding within the retina, growth of abnormal retinal blood vessels, and partial or total vision loss. Retinal vein occlusions are the second most common cause of blood vessel-related vision loss (the first is diabetic retinopathy). Retinal arteries may become blocked when a blood clot or fat deposits get stuck in the arteries. These blockages are more likely if there is hardening of the arteries (atherosclerosis) in the may travel from other parts of the body and block an artery in the retina.

    Study ofthe retinal circulation.I inferior colliculus (Hickam and Frayser, I). From the available evidence (Lennox, Gibbs, and Gibbs, ; Kety, I; Sokoloff, I), it is felt that the overall metabolic rate in the brain can be maintained independent of blood flow over a wide range; an increased flow, for example, would result only in a decreased arteriovenous difference for. The analysis of retinal vasculature provides the unique opportunity to examine microvascular changes noninvasively in humans. Large epidemiological studies using retinal photographs have assessed the association between vascular alterations of the retinal circulation and blood pressure, target organ damage, and cardiovascular events.


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Retinal circulation by George N. Wise Download PDF EPUB FB2

Try the new Google Books. Check out the new look and enjoy easier access to your favorite features. Try it now. No thanks. Try the new Google Books Get print book. No eBook available The Retinal Circulation. George N. Wise, Colin T. Dollery, Paul Henkind. Harper & Row, - Eye.

The Retinal Circulation Hardcover – January 1, by george N. Wise (Author) See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions.

Price New from Used from Hardcover "Please retry" $ — $ Hardcover, January 1, — — — Hardcover from $Author: george N. Wise. Retinal circulation. New York, Harper & Row [©] (OCoLC) Online version: Wise, George N. Retinal circulation. New York, Harper & Row [©] (OCoLC) Document Type: Book: All Authors / Contributors: George N Wise; Colin T Dollery; Paul Henkind.

Henkind P, Wise GN. Retinal neovascularization, collaterals, and vascular shunts. Brit J Ophthal. Landa G, Rosen RB. New patterns of retinal collateral circulation are exposed by a retinal functional imager (RFI).

Br J Opthalmol. ;94(7)   The retina is one of the most vital parts of your vision system. It is a layer of tissue located at the rear of your eye that senses light and relays those images to your brain. Damage or deterioration of your retina can result in many different eye conditions such as macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, and nearsightedness.

The effect of Pa co 2 on retinal blood flow is not species-related; it has been demonstrated in dogs, cats, miniature pigs (), monkeys (), and recently in r, the molecular mechanism of its action is still unclear.

Carbon dioxide is a highly retinal circulation book gas. It crosses the retinal capillary endothelium, rapidly passing into the glial cells. The total retina is a circular disc of between 30 and 40 mm in diameter (Polyak, ; Van Buren, ; Kolb, ). Fig.

A schematic section through the human eye with a schematic enlargement of the retina. The retina is approximately mm thick and lines the back of the eye. Figure 3 A diagram showing details of the retinal and choroidal vasculature and changes that occur at the level of the human fovea.

The branches from the central retinal circulation form two distinct capillary plexi within the ganglion cell layer (the superficial capillary plexus) and in the inner nuclear layer (the deep capillary plexus). Retinal circulation in man and animals by Michaelson, Isaac Chesar and a great selection of related books, Brand new Book.

This book is a facsimile reprint and may contain imperfections such as marks, notations, marginalia and flawed pages. Seller Inventory # APC More information about this seller | Contact this seller 4. RETINAL CIRCULATION [BAILLIART, DOCTEUR] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers.

RETINAL CIRCULATIONAuthor: DOCTEUR BAILLIART. Additional Physical Format: Online version: Michaelson, Isaac Chesar. Retinal circulation in man and animals. Springfield, Ill., Thomas [©] (OCoLC)   Drs. Wise, Dollery, and Henkind have covered far more than the title of their book would suggest.

The topics range from the development of retinal vessels in chapter 1 to a description of retinal vessels in selected animals in chapter 5, from physiologic principles of blood flow and retinal circulation in chapter 6 to experimental retinal vascular diseases in the final chapter, chapter Retinal Circulatory System.

Choroid Damage to the choroid Vorticose veins Central retinal vein & artery Capillaries contained within the choroid in the eye are responsible for the circulation of blood within the eye.

If any of these tiny arteries or veins become blocked by blood clots or lipids (the same fats that eventually harden and form. Brit. Ophthal. () 56, Book reviews The Retinal Circulation. By G. WIsE, C. DOLLERY, and P. HENKIND.figs, refs. Harper and Row, NewYork. ($35) Aclinical ophthalmologist, aphysician, andapathologist, each withmanypublications on the retina to their credit, have combined their talents to produce this excellent book.

Nodisease process ofthe retinal circulation. AIDS can cause infections in the eye, retinal detachment, eyelid tumors and neuro-ophthalmic disorders.

AIDS-related infections can often lead to blindness, but effective eye treatment is now available. Abnormal retinal circulation is another frequent complication of AIDS.

Sometimes, the first signs of AIDS are abnormalities in the retina. Retina is one of the most metabolically active tissues, and it relies on d-glucose for its metabolic activity [1, 4]. The tight junctions composed of endothelial and epithelial cells restrict paracellular diffusion of glucose to the retina from the systemic circulation.

Retinal vascular diseases are disorders that affect the blood vessels in the eyes. They have different ways of affecting vision and eye function, but all of them are involved with restricting blood circulation.

Some causes a change with the blood flow, others disturb the blood vessel structure, while some affect the consistency of the blood itself. The fundus of the eye is the only part of the human body that allows a direct non-invasive observation of the circulatory system.

Retinal vascular tortuosity presents a valuable potential for diagnostic and treatment purposes of relevant vascular and systemic diseases. This work presents a computational metric for the tortuosity characterization that combines mathematical representations of.

[Show full abstract] retinal vasculature on hemodynamics and oxygen distribution in the retinal circulation. The Navier-Stokes equations for blood flow and the convection-diffusion equation for.

Anatomy of the retinal microvasculature. The microvasculature that supplies and drains the inner retina is well described in the classic anatomical text, Gray’s Anatomy (Standring, ).The central retinal artery derives from the ophthalmic branch of the internal carotid artery, entering the optic nerve within the orbit approximately 12 mm behind the globe and subsequently coursing.

That is, when compared to the case of no circulation, TTT heats more of the retinal regions due to circulation of the vitreous humor due to convection. This could lead to thermal damage in unexpected spots of the retinal surface. There is an exciting sequel to.

An international trio of distinguished clinician-scholars have pooled their talents and harnessed their interdisciplinary expertise to produce this book. Their interests span the fields of clinical ophthalmology, internal medicine, ocular pathology, and experimental vascular disease.

Their approach Author: Henry F. Allen.The book divides itself into two equal parts. The first deals with development, anatomy, physiology, and methods; the second, with diseases affecting the retinal circulation. The target role of the circulation in hypertensive and diabetic eye disease is known to all physicians.

These subjects are dealt with in detail.