Last edited by Tygonos
Tuesday, August 4, 2020 | History

2 edition of insular intermediary in the tradition of Lucretius. found in the catalog.

insular intermediary in the tradition of Lucretius.

Brown, Virginia

insular intermediary in the tradition of Lucretius.

by Brown, Virginia

  • 358 Want to read
  • 12 Currently reading

Published by Harvard University Press in Cambridge, MA .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Lucretius Carus, Titus -- Manuscripts,
  • Paleography

  • Edition Notes

    Offprint from: Harvard studies in Classical philology, v. 72.

    The Physical Object
    Paginationp. [301]-308.
    Number of Pages308
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL15562782M

    lines lines lines lines lines lines lines lines lines lines lines lines lines lines lines lines lines lines lines lines lines lines lines lines lines lines lines lines lines Lucretius' memory is perpetuated chiefly by means of his well-known poem, On the Nature of Things.' The poem is men- tioned by Cicero in a letter to his brother Quintus' written early in the year 54 B.C., and Jerome is authority for the questionable tradition that Cicero .

    Greenblatt subtitles his book, “How the World Became Modern” to reflect how deeply the rediscovery of Lucretius affected the Renaissance world. To be fair, the Renaissance was a revolution in many areas; art, culture, religion, science, philosophy, politics, medicine – no one work sparked it. This article is within the scope of WikiProject Classical Greece and Rome, a group of contributors interested in Wikipedia's articles on you would like to join the WikiProject or learn how to contribute, please see our project you need assistance from a classicist, please see our talk page. C This article has been rated as C-Class on the project's quality scale.

      Titus Lucretius Carus (ca. 99–55 B. C.) is known primarily as the Roman author of the long didactic poem De Rerum Natura (On the Nature of Things). In it, he set out to explicate the universe, embracing and refuting ideas of the great Greek s: 7.   The de-versification of Lucretius -- treating it as prose -- is an unintended theme of the most famous contemporary account of Of Things' Nature, Stephen Greenblatt's The Swerve: How the World Became Modern ().Greenblatt begins The Swerve with an account of his youthful discovery of Lucretius through Martin Ferguson Smith's excellent prose translation.


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Insular intermediary in the tradition of Lucretius by Brown, Virginia Download PDF EPUB FB2

Books Advanced Search New Releases Best Sellers & More Children's Books Textbooks Textbook Rentals Best Books of the Month of results for Lucretius Skip to main search results.

Insular art, also known as Hiberno-Saxon art, was produced in the post-Roman history of Ireland and Britain. The term derives from insula, the Latin term for "island"; in this period Britain and Ireland shared a largely common style different from that of the rest of Europe.

Art historians usually group insular art as part of the Migration Period art movement as well as Early Medieval Western. The chronological reach of Insular manuscript illumination extends from the 7th century, when the groundwork laid by Irish monastic founders (such as Patrick, Brendan, Columba, and Aidan) and the missionaries sent from Italy and Gaul to the Anglo-Saxons (Augustine, Mellitus, Paulinus, Felix, and Birinus) had begun to flourish, and it comes to an end in the later years of the.

Lucretius, in full Titus Lucretius Carus, (flourished 1st century bce), Latin poet and philosopher known for his single, long poem, De rerum natura (On the Nature of Things).The poem is the fullest extant statement of the physical theory of the Greek philosopher also alludes to his ethical and logical doctrines.

Introduction to Lucretius’ On the Nature of Things Cyril Baley O f the three great Latin poets Lucretius seems to make the most peculiar appeal to our own age. Catullus and Virgil are for all time; the passionate love-history of a genuine soul and a poet of marvellously wide.

book i book ii book iii book iv book v book vi card: lines lines lines lines lines lines lines lines lines lines lines lines lines lines lines lines lines lines lines lines lines lines.

tradition ostensibly hostile to myth and poetry. One of the strengths of Campbell’s commentary is its deft negotiation of Lucretius’ poetic and philosophical strategies, which allows one to observe the details of this dynamic.

Lucretius has recourse to atoms and void as ex-planatory mechanisms in book 5 less often than elsewhere in the poem. The book concludes with a series of appendices.

Appendix 3 was already referred to above, others are devoted to the capitula, to the authors from Seneca the Elder to the end of the Carolingian period who cite Lucretius, to the correcting hands in O., the foli-ation of the archetype of Lucretius, and the fate of OQS in the early modern period.

PREFACE No one can set about tnnslating Lucretius into English without finding his head full of the great work of H. Munro. Itia not only that certain striking phrases ring in one's ears-dtai claustra, • the Iastnesses of life,' olu UrminuJ baerms, •the deepset boundary-mark,' &c.- but one is possessed with a atrong feeling that he has.

The purpose of the book is to offer an investigation of the textual fate of Lucretius’ poem from its composition until the rediscovery of the work by Poggio in The research, limited to textual and codicological analysis, is the first comprehensive and detailed study of this topic and fills a gap in Lucretian scholarship.

Ginny took his seminar on paleography and wrote a paper that became her first publication, "The 'Insular Intermediary' in the Tradition of Lucretius." This appeared in Harvard Studies in Classical Philology in Her work with Clausen confirmed Ginny in her orientation towards.

heaven” – De Rerum Natura, Book I, This paper is the completion of the master course Lucretius at Utrecht University. The poem De Rerum Natura is comprehensive exposition of the Epicurean world view, and is an influential and important work in the Epicurean tradition.

Within this paper, there is regularly being referred to the. Emma Woolerton: How to believe: The subject of Lucretius's six-book poem De Rerum Natura was not war, love, myth or history – it was atomic physics Published: 21.

By Lucretius Written 50 B.C.E Translated by William Ellery Leonard: Table of Contents Book I: Proem Mother of Rome, delight of Gods and men, Dear Venus that beneath the gliding stars Makest to teem the many-voyaged main And fruitful lands- for all of living things.

National Book Award Winners Announced Stephen Greenblatt's The Swerve, a dramatic account of the Renaissance-era rediscovery of the Latin poet Lucretius, won for e the Bones. Clay, Lucretius and Epicurus (Ithaca, ) is probably the best general introduction to the poem, a careful reading of it as both philosophy and poetry.

Gale, Myth and Poetry in Lucretius (Cambridge, ) is an excellent study of L.'s use of myth, and of the relationship of DRN to the epic tradition. Book Description: In a fresh interpretation of Lucretius'sOn the Nature of Things, Charles Segal reveals this great poetical account of Epicurean philosophy as an important and profound document for the history of Western attitudes toward shows that this poem, aimed at promoting spiritual tranquillity, confronts two anxieties about death not addressed in Epicurus's abstract treatment.

My books on Lucretius are part of this tradition but also diverges from it in important ways worth mentioning. It diverges from Marx’s reading insofar as Marx treats Epicurus and Lucretius as identical and I do not. The difference between Epicurus and Lucretius is one of the most important contributions of my books.

The subject of Lucretius's six-book poem De Rerum Natura was not war, love, myth or history – it was atomic physics Mon 21 Jan EST. Lucretius' account of the origin of life, the origin of species, and human prehistory is the longest and most detailed account extant from the ancient world.

It gives an anti-teleological mechanistic theory of zoogony and the origin of species that does away with the need for any divine aidor design in the process, and accordingly it has been seen as a forerunner of Darwin's theory of evolution.

Lucretius’ main achievement was that he wrote a long poem, On the Nature of Things, about Epicurean philosophy in Latin.

Before there were only Greek books about Epicureanism. Thanks to him, Western philosophers who didn’t know Greek still understood the principles of Epicurean thought.Introduction. The De rerum natura (usually translated as “On the Nature of Things” or “On the Nature of the Universe”) is a Latin poem in six books composed in the mid-1st century BC by Titus Lucretius Carus to introduce a Roman audience to the philosophy of the Greek materialist thinker Epicurus (– BC).The loss of much of Epicurus’s own output means that Lucretius has become.Description: The Editorial Committee of Harvard Studies in Classical Philology welcomes all submissions dealing with any aspects of the civilizations of ancient Greece and Rome.

In considering submissions for publication in Harvard Studies, we adhere to an inclusive definition of what constitutes philology, and we welcome variety in approaches to the study of the ancient world.